Georgia State Parks and Historic Sites
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Although the Nashville remains on the bottom of the Ogeechee River today, some of her has been recovered through underwater archaeology. That such a task is a worthy one is obvious to the historian and the archaeologist. To the general public, it may not be so readily apparent. The evidence of the vessel's life and destruction becomes tangible through the recovery and display of artifacts. They are defined as the physical evidence of earlier human activity. They possess spiritual and physical links to the past that are readily available to those whose who see or touch them. They are evidence, primary evidence, providing a concrete connection in time and space between then and now.

As part of the people's history, such objects are required by state law to be held for preservation, conservation and curation by the State of Georgia. To that end, the Nashville's artifacts have been stored at the State Preservation Laboratory at Panola Mountain. There, they have been inventoried, i.e. photographed and identified. The proper storage has been determined for preservation and those objects in need of restoration are being worked on as possible.

Today, some of these items will be on public exhibit for the first time since their recovery at Fort McAllister's new Nashville exhibit to open in February of 2002. See these artifacts at the site or in the Museum Tour on this website.





The Future of The Nashville

Many of the artifacts recovered so far are too large or damaged for appropriate display. As these photos reveal, their recovery and preservation can be a very complex task. We at Fort McAllister have designed a protected outdoor exhibit to better utilize these heavy iron pieces.

For the amateur archaeologist or recreation diver, it is wise to remind one that underwater archaeology is both difficult and sometimes, dangerous. Further, it is at present covered under Georgia law. Because the Nashville lies in the mud of a Georgia river, it is state property and cannot be explored currently. All artifacts are considered the property of the state under the jurisdiction of the Department of Natural Resources. Although currently undergoing revision, a pamphlet is available at all state parks and historic sites advising citizens of these legal restrictions.

 


Websites and Books

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-us-cs/csa-name.htm

FIRE AND THUNDER EXPLOITS OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES' NAVY,
by R. Thomas Campbell       ISBN 1-57249-067-5     Burd Street Press

UNDAUNTED THE HISTORY OF FORT McALLISTER GEORGIA,
by William E. Christman      Library of Congress 96-77666     Darien
Printing and Graphics.

TANGLED MACHINERY AND CHARRED RELICS, by Chance, Chance and
Topper    Library of Congress 85-061386     Sun Printing

REMINISCENCES OF CONFEDERATE SERVICE 1861-1865, by Francis
W. Dawson     ISBN 0-8071-1885-0      Louisiana State Univ. Press.

 




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